Perahu Tambang at Kuching Kampung Heritage

Perahu Tambang at Kuching Kampung Heritage

The perahu tambang are traditionally described as a passenger boat made out of timber with thatch leaf roof (although aluminium are now commonly used) that can carry 8 to 10 passengers at a time (Rahman, 2015; Manan, 2014), and has horizontal seats on both sides of the boat (Mohd Yusoff, 2013). Some are 15 feet (4.6 meters) long and 4 to 5 feet (1.2 to 1.5 meters) broad, while some are even longer and wider. The size of the perahu tambang may differ and the construction of a perahu tambang in Brooke era did not use any nails unlike in the modern ones (Taboh, 2014), instead they used pasak (timber pegs) system. Nails and steel joints are used today as to strengthen the structure of the boat and ease the construction process. Timber is used as the main material as they are strong. The process require communal works from various people as the process can be complicated. In term of...
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Bot Penambang Kuching Kini Berwajah Baru, Turut Dilengkapi Panel Solar

Bot Penambang Kuching Kini Berwajah Baru, Turut Dilengkapi Panel Solar

Bot Penambang Kuching Kini Berwajah Baru, Turut Dilengkapi Panel Solar 12 buah bot penambang yang beroperasi di Waterfront Kuching kini berwajah baru apabila satu inisiatif diadakan untuk menaiktaraf bot bot penambang tersebut. Proses naik taraf bot penambang ini dilakukan oleh Fakulti Alam Bina UNIMAS dan merupakan salah satu cabang dalam Projek Old Kampung Heritage yang dijalankan oleh Kerajaan Negeri Sarawak. Proses naik taraf bot penambang ini dibahagi kepada beberapa peringkat meliputi cadangan corak, pemilihan corak sehingga ke pemasangan panel solar dan melibatkan kerjasama pelbagai pihak bagi memastikan projek ini berjaya. [Source: "Bot Penambang Kuching Kini Berwajah Baru, Turut Dilengkapi Panel Solar" published by I Love Kuching]...
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Design Components of Perahu Tambang

Design Components of Perahu Tambang

The perahu tambang are traditionally described as a passenger boat made out of timber with thatch leaf roof (although aluminium are now commonly used) that can carry 8 to 10 passengers at a time (Rahman, 2015; Manan, 2014), and has horizontal seats on both sides of the boat (Mohd Yusoff, 2013). Some are 15 feet (4.6 meters) long and 4 to 5 feet (1.2 to 1.5 meters) broad, while some are even longer and wider. The size of the perahu tambang may differ and the construction of a perahu tambang in Brooke era did not use any nails unlike in the modern ones (Taboh, 2014), instead they used pasak (timber pegs) system. Nails and steel joints are used today as to strengthen the structure of the boat and ease the construction process. Timber is used as the main material as they are strong. The process require communal works from various people as the process can be complicated. In term of...
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The Operation of Perahu Tambang by Atta Idrawani Zaini

The Operation of Perahu Tambang by Atta Idrawani Zaini

A passenger has to wait at a landing place, or locally known as the pengkalan to board any perahu tambang (Mohd Yusoff, 2013). The perahu tambang operate between these pengkalan along the Sarawak river banks. The method of crossing the river has changed very little, with the more apparent improvement is the use of engines replacing manual plying (Manan, 2014). Initially the perahu tambang would cross the 400-meter-wide river within almost 10 minutes to get from one end to another (Rahman, 2015). The principle of the manoeuvring is based on the tidal current. The pak tambang would stand at the bow facing forward and manoeuvre it with oars which are fixed to two pieces of timber in the gunnel (Mohd Yusoff, 2013). They would get help from the current whereby they will very quickly get into the stream, and where they are forced to move against the current, they will hug the shore for as long as possible (Zainal Abidin...
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The Perahu Tambang Culture by Atta Idrawani Zaini

The Perahu Tambang Culture by Atta Idrawani Zaini

“.. house-boats belonging to Malays, filled with women and children. There were roofed in to shelter their inmates from the rain or sun and were usually propelled by old men sitting in the bows cross-legged.” Margaret Brooke (1913), My Life in Sarawak. Perahu tambang photo taken in 1890s (Source: Malaysia, A Pictorial History 1400-2004) The perahu tambang were reported already in operation since the 1800s, as this is where the trading between the Malay, Dayak and the Chinese took place (Tan, 2009). Chinese settlements can be traced back around that time, when the Chinese immigrants were involved in the trading activities in Kuching, and gold and antimony mining in Bau. An excerpt from an interview conducted by Tan (2009) stated that the local Malays modelled the perahu tambang based on the Chinese boats. However, the origin of the design is not yet concretely confirmed. The Malay kampongs around the fort and Astana have existed even before the first Rajah arrived in Kuching (Awang Pawi,...
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Old Kuching Kampung Heritage: The Perahu Tambang by Atta Idrawani Zaini

Old Kuching Kampung Heritage: The Perahu Tambang by Atta Idrawani Zaini

“Sungai Sarawak penuh keliaran perahu tambang, Hilir mudik mansang berlawan, Menyusur arus bawa penumpang.” An excerpt from Madzhi Johari’s song - ‘Oh Pak Tambang’ (Source: https://sarawaktourism.com/attraction/kuching-waterfront/) The ephemeral purplish orange dawn in Kuching’s sky sets up a scenic backdrop for the Sarawak’s capital city. Indulging in the romantic ambience are people wandering along the Kuching Waterfront overlooking the Sarawak river. Blending in this picturesque scenery are the people who spend most of their time on the river itself, the boatmen who are always busy in giving the river a pulse of life by carrying passengers crossing to the other side. Before there were bridges connecting both sides of the river, they were the only option. These are the boat plyers, or also locally known as pak tambang (or penambang), plying the Kuching’s iconic boats that are known as the perahu tambang (or ‘perauk’ tambang). Their livelihood has been around from at least the 1800s and still survive until today....
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